MANY SYMPTOMS.

ONE CAUSE.

People living with XLH.

X-Linked Hypophosphatemia Cause and Symptoms

X-Linked Hypophosphatemia Cause and Symptoms

People living with XLH.

MANY SYMPTOMS.

ONE CAUSE.


SYMPTOMS SEEM UNRELATED?
IT COULD BE X-LINKED HYPOPHOSPHATEMIA (XLH)

SYMPTOMS SEEM UNRELATED?
IT COULD BE XLH

(X-LINKED HYPOPHOSPHATEMIA)

Stiffness, bone and joint pain, and ongoing dental issues may be connected by a common cause. If symptoms have gotten worse over time, they could be related to a rare genetic disease called X-linked hypophosphatemia, or XLH.


Symptoms video thumbnail

Check out this video to see if your symptoms could add up to XLH.

SYMPTOMS CAN DIFFER FOR EVERYONE AND MAY VARY AMONG CHILDREN AND ADULTS

SYMPTOMS CAN DIFFER FOR EVERYONE AND MAY VARY AMONG CHILDREN AND ADULTS

Bowed legs icon

BOWED
LEGS

Short stature icon

SHORT
STATURE

Bone and joint pain icon

BONE AND
JOINT PAIN

Recurrsing fractures icon

RECURRING
FRACTURES

Ongoing dental issues icon

ONGOING
DENTAL ISSUES

WHAT IS XLH?

XLH is a hereditary, progressive, and lifelong disease that affects thousands of children and adults. In fact, up to 16,000 people in the United States are estimated to have XLH.

People with XLH can lose too much phosphorus through their urine, causing low levels of phosphorus in their blood. This is called hypophosphatemia. It can seriously affect areas of the body such as bones, muscles, and teeth in children and adults.

What is X-linked hypophosphatemia video thumbnail

Watch this video to help you and your family learn more about XLH and see what happens inside the body.

XLH CAN RUN IN YOUR FAMILY*

XLH is “X-linked” because it can only be passed on to children through an X chromosome.
Take a look at how XLH may affect more than just you or your family member.

family icon

If a father has XLH,

all his daughters and
no sons will have XLH.

family icon

If a mother has XLH,

each of her children (boy or girl)
has a 50% chance of inheriting XLH.

*Children can also be born with XLH, even if there’s no family history of the disease.
This is called a spontaneous case and it can happen for up to 30% of people who have XLH.

DO YOU THINK YOU OR YOUR FAMILY MEMBER MIGHT HAVE XLH?

Sign up today to start receiving resources, newsletters,
and other important information to help manage XLH.

finding
the right healthcare team

It’s important to find doctors who are knowledgeable about XLH and can help identify and manage it. The earlier you or your child is diagnosed, the earlier management of this progressive disease can begin.

By staying informed and actively engaging with your healthcare team, you can better understand how to manage XLH and become an advocate for yourself or your family member.

Finding the right healthcare team video thumbnail play icon

Watch Melissa and Gini share the importance of being persistent to find the right doctors.

LIVING WITH XLH

XLH may be rare, but it shouldn’t be isolating. There are communities of people living with this condition, including parents,
who are telling their stories of how they have learned to manage XLH.

WATCH GINI’S STORY

“You just have to check in with your own body…
I think the point should be to have a good life.”

Gini video thumbnail play icon

WATCH CHERYL’S
STORY

“Try not to focus on
having a disease…
and live your life to the fullest.”

Cheryl video thumbnail play icon

CONTINUE
YOUR JOURNEY

If you’re looking for more information on XLH, we’ve got you covered. Take a deeper dive into diagnosing, managing, and finding support for XLH and discover all the resources available to you.